Nascar Tracks Information
Atlanta Motor Speedway
Since being purchased by Bruton Smith in 1990, Atlanta Motor Speedway has become an ultra-modern, multi-purpose venue that has raised the bar of excellence. Amenities include a nine-story office/condominium complex, improved parking, over 53,000 additional permanent seats, a road course, a four-color electronic message center, a new ticket office and gift shop. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 24 degrees
Distance: 1.54 miles
Shape: Oval
Big Daddy's South Boston Speedway
Big Daddy's South Boston Speedway, located in southern Virginia, was enlarged from .357 to .4 miles before the 1994 season. After hosting 35 NASCAR Busch Series events since 1982, the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series took to Big Daddy's South Boston Speedway track for the first time in 2001. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 12 degrees
Distance: 0.4 miles
Shape: Oval
Bristol Motor Speedway
Bristol, one of the shortest tracks on the Winston Cup circuit, has the highest banking, making for an appealing combination for driver and spectator alike. Added to the schedule in 1961 and resurfaced from asphalt to concrete in 1992, Bristol's attendance has increased from 18,000 to well over 160,000 with the reconstruction of the speedway's backstretch. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 36 degrees
Distance: 0.533 miles
Shape: Oval
California Speedway
Situated on the site of the former Kaiser Steel mill approximately 40 miles east of Los Angeles, California Speedway is a great place to watch a race and experience the thrills of NASCAR. It is one of the premier auto racing venues in the country, hosting six major racing weekends, which includes the largest attended sporting event in the state. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 14 degrees
Distance: 2.0 miles
Shape: D-shaped oval
Chicagoland Speedway
Chicagoland Speedway, which held Winston Cup and Busch Series events for the first time in 2001, includes grandstand seating for 75,000 spectators, 37 luxury suites, on-site parking and camping areas and reserved long-term parking areas for recreational vehicles in the infield adjacent to the second and third turns. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 18 degrees
Distance: 1.5 miles
Shape: Tri-oval
Darlington Raceway
Every driver who has strapped on a helmet and climbed behind the steering wheel has wanted to win at Darlington because the toughest is most desirable. For those few select drivers who have won races at the granddaddy of superspeedways, there is a priceless satisfaction in knowing they've conquered the unique egg-shaped oval nicknamed "Too Tough To Tame." Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 25/23 degrees
Distance: 1.366 miles
Shape: Oval
Daytona International Speedway
Since 1959, Daytona International Speedway has hosted the Daytona 500, now the culmination of a two-week festival of speed known as Speedweeks. In early July, the track hosts the night-time running of the Pepsi 400. In addition to Busch Series and Craftsman Truck events, the track also hosts the sports-car Rolex 24 at Daytona, and motorcycle and karting events. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 31 degrees
Distance: 2.5 miles
Shape: Tri-oval
Dover International Speedway
With a brand of racing that is as intimate as it is intense, there's no wonder why people continue to flock to "The Monster Mile." Dover, with seating for more than 140,000, is one of the most popular race destinations in the Northeast and hosts some of the biggest crowds to see a sporting event between New York and North Carolina. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 24 degrees
Distance: 1.0 miles
Shape: Oval
Gateway International Raceway
Auto racing has a rich history in the St. Louis area, and the area has produced some of NASCAR's brightest stars. Gateway is equipped to host almost any form of major league motorsports on its egg-shapped oval with two unique sets of turns, a 1.6-mile road course and a quarter-mile drag strip. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 11|9 degrees
Distance: 1.25 miles
Shape: Oval
Homestead Miami Speedway
NASCAR racing made its debut in the Miami area in 1995, drawing a sellout crowd of 60,000 to its first event. The track has a $100 million annual impact on the local economy and draws more than 300,000 racing enthusiasts annually to the area. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 20 degrees
Distance: 1.5 miles
Shape: Oval
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Built originally as a test facility for the burgeoning Indiana car industry, the track was paved with 3.2 million bricks following a series of races in 1909. Since 1911, the Brickyard has hosted one of the most famous races in the world -- the Indianapolis 500-Mile Race. In the inaugural 1994 Brickyard 400, Hoosier fan favorite Jeff Gordon won the first of his three titles. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 9 degrees
Distance: 2.5 miles
Shape: Oval
Indianapolis Raceway Park
This historic racing facility had its beginnings as a dream on the part of 15 racing professionals and area businessmen. It is now the site of three world-famous race courses -- a 4,400-foot drag strip, a .686-mile oval and a 15-turn, 2.5-mile road course. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 12 degrees
Distance: 0.686 miles
Shape: Oval
Infineon Raceway
Infineon Raceway is one of the premier road racing venues in the country, and one of the few on the NASCAR Winston Cup Series circuit. The facility first opened in 1968 and serves as the gateway to the beautiful and scenic Sonoma Valley, which serves as one of the top wine-producing regions in the world. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: --
Distance: 2.0 miles
Shape: Road course
Kansas Speedway
Kansas Speedway boasts great views from every seat and easy access in and out of the 1 1/2-mile, state-of-the-art facility, a response to growing interest for motorsports entertainment in the Midwest. Though the tri-oval track design is not unique to Kansas Speedway, a slight difference in the banking makes this track unique. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 15 degrees
Distance: 1.5 miles
Shape: Tri-oval
Kentucky Speedway
Co-owned by Jerry Carroll and developed on 1,000 acres, the $152 million Kentucky Speedway is a state-of-the-art venue for all stock and open wheel racing series. The speedway features a 1.5-mile tri-oval, quarter-mile paved track and parking for more than 30,000 cars and 2,000 RVs. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 14 degrees
Distance: 1.5 miles
Shape: Tri-oval
Las Vegas Motor Speedway
Las Vegas Motor Speedway has the distinction of being the first completely new superspeedway to be built in the southwest region of the United States in more than 20 years. The track features a 1.5-mile superspeedway, a 2.5-mile FIA-approved road course, a 4,000-foot drag strip, paved and dirt short tracks, motocross circuits, stadium truck racing facilities, go-kart and Legends cars layouts as well as a Junior Drag racing strip. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 12 degrees
Distance: 1.5 miles
Shape: Tri-oval
Lowe's Motor Speedway
Built more than four decades ago, the largest sports facility in the Southeast has 167,000 permanent seats, including 121 executive suites, and capacity for nearly 50,000 more spectators in the infield area. Lowe's Motor Speedway was the first superspeedway to host night racing in 1992 and was the first sports facility in America to offer year-round living accommodations when it released 40 condominiums for sale high above Turn One in 1984. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 24 degrees
Distance: 1.5 miles
Shape: Quad-oval
Martinsville Speedway
The paperclip-shaped short track known as Martinsville opened in 1947, two years before NASCAR was founded. Under the direction of H. Clay Earles, who ran the speedway until his death in 1999, Martinsville grew from a dusty, rough-hewn operation into one of the most beautiful and modern racing facilities around. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 12 degrees
Distance: 0.526 miles
Shape: Oval
Memphis Motorsports Park
In 1986, Memphis Motorsports Park started out as a multi-track facility run by a group of investors headed by Ed Gatlin. Ten years later, the Grand Prix Association of Long Beach, one of the major players in American motorsports, bought Memphis Motorsports Park from Gatlin's group. Now they have reached out to Mid-America in a big way. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 11 degrees
Distance: 0.75 miles
Shape: Oval
Michigan International Speedway
Michigan International Speedway is recognized as one of motorsports' premier facilities because of its wide racing surface and high banking. These two factors make three- and four-abreast racing as routine as the checkered flag at the end of a race. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 18 degrees
Distance: 2.0 miles
Shape: Tri-oval
The Milwaukee Mile
Since the 1870s, there has been racing on what is now known as the Milwaukee Mile. Located on land that was originally a horse farm, the track was used for training and racing thoroughbreds. In 1891, the farm was purchased by the Wisconsin Agricultural Society to create a permanent site for the State Fair. The first auto race was held in 1903 and the oval was paved in 1954. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 9.25 degrees
Distance: 1.0 miles
Shape: Oval
Nashville Superspeedway
Nashville Superspeedway, built in 2000, is one of only three concrete tracks on the NASCAR circuit. The pavement, consisting of 7,500 cubic yards of concrete, was placed full-width for the entire length of the track by a concrete paving machine that was specially constructed for this project. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 14 degrees
Distance: 1.333 miles
Shape: Oval
Nazareth Speedway
The modern day Nazareth Speedway was originally Nazareth National Speedway, a semi-banked, dirt, D-shaped 1-1|8 mile oval built in 1966. The track lay dormant for nearly a decade starting in 1971, then hosted special events only before going into backruptcy. Penske Speedway, Inc. purchased the 90-acre facility in 1986 and immediately began an extensive renovation project which included paving the track. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 3|4|6 degrees
Distance: 1.0 miles
Shape: Oval
New Hampshire International Speedway
The two NASCAR Winston Cup Series races at New Hampshire International Speedway are largest spectator sporting events in New England with 101,000 guests in attendance at each race. NHIS is located one hour from Boston, two hours from Portland, Maine, and Providence, R.I., and is easily accessible from Vermont and Canada. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 12 degrees
Distance: 1.058 miles
Shape: Oval
North Caroline Speedway
A joint venture between Darlington Raceway builder Harold Brasington and landowner Bill Land, North Carolina Speedway's first race was held in 1965. Over time, the track came under control of L.G. DeWitt, a local trucking company executive who supervised reshaping the original flat mile track into the present, banked 1.017-mile oval in 1969. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 22|25 degrees
Distance: 1.017 miles
Shape: Oval
Phoenix International Raceway
Set at the base of the Estrella Mountains, near the Salt and Gila Rivers, PIR is as much a fixture of the local landscape as its natural counterparts. PIR first opened its gates in 1964 and since that time has earned a reputation as one of the top facilities of its kind in the nation. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 11|9 degrees
Distance: 1.0 miles
Shape: Oval
Pikes Peak International Raceway
Pikes Peak International Raceway consists of a 1-mile D-shaped oval and a 1.3-mile road course with grandstand seating for over 42,000 fans. The lowest row of grandstand seating is elevated 16 feet above ground level, providing a complete view of the track from nearly every seat. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 10 degrees
Distance: 1.0 miles
Shape: Oval
Pocono Raceway
Pocono's unique 2.5-mile tri-oval features three turns, each with a different degree of banking, and three straights, each with a different length. This combination produces fender-to-fender action in the turns, 200 mph slingshots on the long straights and photo-finish endings. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 14|8|6 degrees
Distance: 2.5 miles
Shape: Tri-oval
Richmond International Raceway
The present facility was built on the site of a half-mile track that first hosted dirt auto races in the 1940s. The original track was paved in 1968. RIR was redesigned in 1988 between the spring and fall races. Recent renovations have made it one of the most modern speedways on the tour. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 14 degrees
Distance: 0.75 miles
Shape: Oval
Talladega Superspeedway
Talladega Superspeedway is the biggest, fastest, most competitive motorsports facility in the world. Records for both speed and competition have been established at Talladega. Built at a cost of more than $4 million, the track opened as Alabama International Motor Speedway in 1969. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 33 degrees
Distance: 2.66 miles
Shape: Tri-oval
Texas Motor Speedway
Texas Motor Speedway is a motorsports haven along the historic Chisholm Trail in Fort Worth. It features seating for 150,061 fans. It represents the pinnacle in luxury for fans of auto racing, as the facility features 194 skybox VIP suites. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: 24 degrees
Distance: 1.5 miles
Shape: Quad-oval
Watkins Glen International
Watkins Glen International continues a road-racing tradition that dates back to 1948 -- when sports cars competed on the streets of the village at the southern tip of scenic Lake Seneca. The circuit, which at one time hosted the F1 United States Grand Prix, has grown to become one of the most respected facilities in the northeast. Track Facts
Banking/Turns: --
Distance: 2.45 miles
Shape: Road course

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